Monthly Archives: October 2017

Boilerplate for ScottKit games: standard actions

After the recent sequence of ScottKit tutorials (building gamesrooms and itemsactions, occurrences, darkness and light), there remain only two major concepts left to introduce: counters and saved rooms. But before we launch into those, we’ll take a break and look at some standard bits and pieces we’re likely to include in most or all games. We’ll use the same map as last time, since we’re making no major changes:


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Europhobia

When talking about British politicians who want the UK to leave Europe, it’s time to stop extending them the courtesy of describing them as “Eurosceptic”. That term suggests they’ve invested a lot of thought and effort into reaching a position that has reservations about — is sceptical about — Europe.

But it’s clearer with literally every passing day that the Brexit experiment is a total disaster — economically, culturally, educationally, technologically, politically. Those who still want to press on with it are way past the point of scepticism and into all-our paranoia, conspiracy theory and irrational fear — in other words, phobia.

They are Europhobes.

Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency (2016), Season 1

I watched this on the recommendation of a colleague. It consists of eight 45-minute episodes, for a total of six hours, and tells a interestingly convoluted story involving time travel, body-swapping, a hippie cult and the FBI.

I thought it was sort of OK. I suspect I would have liked it rather more if it wasn’t called Dirk Gently, because it has very nearly nothing at all to do with the Douglas Adams books that it is supposedly based on.

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Darkness and light in ScottKit

Last time out, we learned how to have things happen to the player in ScottKit; that was the natural complement of the player doing things, which we covered the time before. Today, we’ll use that knowledge to deal with darkness, light, light sources, and their expiry and refilling. Here’s the expanded map:

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PutFixedDueDateScheduleStorageFixedDueDateSchedulesByFixedDueDateScheduleIdResponse

In a project we’re working on, a Java source file is auto-generated: method names on the interface that is generated (ready for implementing) are based on the HTTP method and URL in the RAML.

The result is this:

asyncResultHandler.handle(Future.succeededFuture(
    PutFixedDueDateScheduleStorageFixedDueDateSchedulesByFixedDueDateScheduleIdResponse
        .withNoContent()));

What we have here is a single identifier that, at 83 characters in length, is too wide to fit in standard 80-character-wide terminal.

File under “Why Java Is Not My Favourite Programming Language”.

(No, there is no reason why a similar identifier could not in principle be generated in some other programming language. But no other language has the programming culture that make such things possible.)

Occurrences (or daemons) in ScottKit

Last time we looked at how ScottKit games handle the player’s actions. But sometimes you need actions to happen independently of what the user does. If you’re in a frozen wilderness, maybe there’s ten percent chance each turn of freezing to death; or if there’s a thief here and you’re carrying a crown, he might steal it.

That’s what we’re going to look at this time. Here’s the map for today’s version of the game we’re working on:

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Actions in ScottKit

pLast time, we saw how to make rooms and items in ScottKit. We used these to build a small but not completely trivial game with three rooms, in which you can move through from the start room to where a coin is found, and bring it back to where you started.

Now we’re going to see how to use actions to code up puzzles. Here’s how the map of the game is going to look when we’ve finished with it today:

As you can see, the rooms and exits are basically the same as the map for the previous iteration, But we’ve added a couple of items and — crucially — the first puzzle.

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